Browse: YOUTH

Helping Children Cope with Traumatic Events

2012
Helping Children Cope with Traumatic Events was developed in response to the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. This booklet provides practical guidance for caregivers—including parents, family members, teachers, clergy, and volunteers—on how to help support children after a traumatic event. This booklet provides readers with an overview of common reactions to violent acts, including a breakdown of common signs and symptoms by age. Concrete steps for caring for children’s emotional and spiritual needs in the wake of a traumatic event are also provided.
by Humanitarian Disaster Institute
Views: 1499

Child Protection Policy Guidelines

Aug. 2007
Article from the August 2007 WEA Connections Magazine.
by Global Connections
Views: 1425

Guide to mobilising and strengthening community-led care for orphans and vulnerable children

2005
This guide, developed by World Vision’s Models of Learning team, provides practical tools for those seeking to mobilize and strengthen community-led care for orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). These tools reflect global best practice, using the "community care coalition" concept. PDF: 5.45 Mb
by World Vision HIV/AIDS Hope Initiative
Views: 1745

What can world leaders do about 9.2 million children under five dying every year?

2009
World Vision has a series of recommendations to leaders of both donor countries and developing countries to reduce child mortality. PDF: 1.72 Mb
by World Vision
Views: 1664

Who’s counting? 9.2 million children – the cost of inaction on child health

2009
A large and growing body of research and on-the-ground experience indicates that comprehensive provision of appropriate health services at the community and district levels will make a very big difference to the lives of poor children and their mothers. PDF: 502 Kb
by World Vision
Views: 1708

World Vision Education Strategy

Nov. 2011
World Vision’s education strategy seeks to assure that children attain the core skills and abilities they need to go on to lead a productive and fulfilling life. It aligns with the shared global commitment to the Education-for-All Dakar goal that calls for all children receiving ‘recognized’ and ‘measurable’ levels of reading, basic mathematics, and the most essential life skills. PDF: 119Kb
by World Vision
Views: 1475

Hear us again!

2007
Five years ago, more than 7,000 people participated in the UN General Assembly Special Session on Children, at which the nations of the world committed themselves to a series of goals to improve the well-being of children. It is time to re-evaluate progress toward these goals. This brochure captures the voices of children from around the world as they reflect on their own well-being. PDF: 593 Kb
by World Vision
Views: 1312

Global Future 2009, Number 2

2009
Twenty-five-thousand children are dying each day – yet we have the means to prevent two thirds of these deaths through proven and affordable interventions. As an international community, how can we generate the will to end this travesty? PDF: 2.13 Mb
by World Vision
Views: 1727

Global Future 2007, Number 2

2007
Eighty million children (44 million of them girls) are out of school, with marginalised groups (26 million disabled and 30 million conflict-affected children) among those excluded. This edition of Global Future magazine looks at ways this gap can be closed. PDF: 2.52 Mb
by World Vision
Views: 1687

Global Future 2007, Number 1

2007
The success of the first child survival revolution, in the 1980s, is saving some 6 million lives each year. But communities are still suffering from unacceptable conditions that lead to disease and death. Read World Vision's and others' perspectives in Global Future magazine. PDF: 3.70 Mb
by World Vision
Views: 1731

Global Future 2006, Number 1

2006
It is unconscionable that children – the most vulnerable members of society – remain on the periphery of the world's response to the AIDS pandemic. In prevention, care and treatment, children and youth are given lowest priority or are off the agenda entirely. PDF: 0.76 Mb
by World Vision
Views: 1676

El Salvador: Children who harvest sugarcane

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1289

Ecuador: Children who sell drugs

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1315

Dominican Republic: Children who work in automotive repair shops

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1265

Costa Rica: Girls in domestic work

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1256

Colombia: Children who sell in the streets

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1291

Chile: Children who work in the mountains

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1314

Brazil: Children who work in the market

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1318

Bolivia: Children who work in tin mines

2007
With this publication, World Vision wants to make a contribution in tackling child labor by making proposals and inviting the reader to know closely the life, family, feelings, experiences and context of the children who work in 13 countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. We will have close relationships with such children through a country context analysis, interviews, adult testimonies and portraits of the daily lives of working children and their families. “In Exchange for My Childhood” opens doors to the private lives of working children, urging us to commit – as organization and personally – to the transformation of our society, so that life in all its fullness may finally be a reality for every child in Latin America and the Caribbean.
by World Vision
Views: 1332

Kids Understand How Other Kids Hurt

Nov. 2008
During 2007 and 2008, World Vision consulted over 400 boys and girls across the world involved in projects that address the sexual abuse and exploitation of children and adolescents. Young people aged ten to 21 from Africa, Europe, Asia and Latin America shared stories of how they have dealt with and are already engaged in combating such abuses in their communities. PDF: 5.59 Kb
by World Vision
Views: 1375
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